Interesting Stuff

This page is here to post anything of interest relating to Cessna 195’s or Classic Aviation. If you have an idea for a posting that others would enjoy, let us know. Having everything in electronic formats (text document and pictures in Jpg) helps. If it is not we can still work with it, it just takes longer to get it all formatted and posted.

This page was constructed with the help of Jerry Vaught, a long time Cessna 190/195 enthusiast and, as you can see from the picture above, a master machinist. We got our own personal viewing of these works of art when Jerry visited us at the shop. He was interested in the 195 projects in progress and I was fighting the urge to turn all of the engine crank snouts. They all have a full rotating assembly inside (crankshaft, rods and pistons) and each one turns with smooth precision. Even the 4360 with 28 cylinders! The whole time I was admiring these engines I was thinking about my old R/C stuff in the attic. Carburetors, glow plugs, fuel... It's probably just as well they couldn't stay longer.

I'm not sure if the 190 and 195's that he owned led him to his passion for radial engines or if it was the other way around, but these creations are the result of a lot of interest and talent. There is over 5,000 hours of tedious labor invested in these eight examples. Jerry told me that he built these out of personal interest and so others could enjoy them. Now that's a Classic Aircraft Enthusiast! Enjoy.

Szekely SR-3L

Szekely SR-3L

The Szekely 3 cylinder radial engines were of the 1920's era. This and many other engines of the period had no internal lubrication to the rockers and required manual lubrication with a grease gun every 3-5 hours of operation. The Buhl Aircraft Co. used this engine, rated at 45 hp as the powerplant for the "Bull Pup", a single seat sport monoplane. This engine model is a single row 3 cylinder air cooled radial scaled down to 5.625 inches in diameter.

  • Total hours to completion: 139.8
  • Total number of internal moving parts: 43
  • Total number of components: 155
  • Materials used: 6061 Aluminum, 10-20 Steel and 360 Brass Alloy
  • Assembly hardware: 0-80 and 2-56 machine screws

Kinner K5

Kinner K5

The Kinner K5 was the most popular engine in the 100 hp class. It was used in many sport planes and military trainers such as the Ryan PT-22. This engine is a 5 cylinder single row air cooled radial scaled down to 6.5 inches in diameter.

  • Total hours to completion: 233.0
  • Total number of internal moving parts: 34
  • Total number of components: 219
  • Materials used: 6061 Aluminum, 10-20 Steel, & 360 Brass Alloy
  • Assembly hardware: 0-80 & 2-56 machine screws

Curtiss Challenger R-600

Curtiss Challenger R-600

This was the first double row radial engine developed in the United States. Like most of the other 1920's vintage engines it had no internal oiling to the rocker boxes and required regular manual greasing of the rockers. The Curtiss Robin is one of the more notable airplanes that used this powerplant. This engine is a 6 cylinder double row air cooled radial scaled down to 6.5 inches in diameter.

  • Total hours to completion: 279.6
  • Total number of internal moving parts: 33
  • Total number of components: 219
  • Materials used: 6061 Aluminum, 10-20 Steel & 360 Brass Alloy
  • Assembly hardware: 0-80 & 2-56 machine screws

Jacobs R-755

Jacobs R-755

There were 3 original models of the 755 cubic inch Jacobs engines, the R-755-9, -A2 & -B2, rated at 245, 300 & 275 hp respectively. The -9 or L4 series were mass produced for the military mostly for the Cessna UC-78 or T-50. Some Wacos and the Cessna 195 / LC-126 series used all models of this engine as well. This engine is a 7 cylinder single row air cooled radial scaled down to 7.25 inches in diameter.

  • Total hours to completion: 326.2
  • Total number of internal moving parts: 38
  • Total number of components: 403
  • Materials used: 6061 Aluminum, 10-20 Steel & 360 Brass Alloy
  • Assembly hardware: 0-80 & 2-56 machine screws

Wright Cyclone R-1820

Wright Cyclone R-1820

Boeing B-17's, Douglas DC-3's and North American T-28's were some of the airplanes that used models of the R-1820 as their powerplant. This Engine is a 9 cylinder single row air cooled radial scaled down to 9.375 inches in diameter.

  • Total hours to completion: 419.4
  • Total number of internal moving parts: 52
  • Total number of components: 602
  • Materials used: 6061 Aluminum, 10-20 Steel & 360 Brass Alloy
  • Assembly Hardware: 0-80 & 2-56 machine screws

Wright Cyclone R-2600

Wright Cyclone R-2600

The North American B-25, Grumman TBF/TBM, and the Consolidated PBY were some of the aircraft that used the R-2600 Powerplant. This engine is a 14 cylinder double row air cooled radial scaled down to 7.25 inches in diameter.

  • Total hours to completion: 652.4
  • Total number of internal moving parts: 74
  • Total number of components: 788
  • Materials used: 6061 Aluminum, 10-20 Steel & 360 Brass Alloy
  • Assembly hardware: 0-80 & 2-56 machine screws

Wright Cyclone R-3350

Wright Cyclone R-3350

The R-3350 was used in the Boeing B-29, P2V Neptune, and the Lockheed Constellation. It is often used as an alternative powerplant in racing and upgraded aircraft such as the Bearcat and Sea Fury. This engine is an 18 cylinder double row air cooled radial scaled down to 9.375 inches in diameter.

  • Total hours to completion: 838.8
  • Total number of internal moving parts: 99
  • Total number of components: 1,066
  • Materials used: 6061 Aluminum, 10-20 Steel, & 360 Brass Alloy
  • Assembly hardware: 0-80 & 2-56 machine screws

Pratt & whitney Wasp Major R-4360

Pratt & whitney Wasp Major R-4360

This has got to be one of the most notable aircraft engines of all time! Nicknamed the "Corn Cob", this beast was used in the Consolidated B-36, Boeing Stratocruiser, F2G Super Corsair, and Howard Hughes' Spruce Goose just to name a few. This engine is a 28 cylinder 4 row air cooled radial scaled down to 7.25 inches in diameter.

  • Total hours to completion: 1304.8
  • Total number of internal moving parts: 148
  • Total number of components: 1,690
  • Materials used: 6061 Aluminum, 10-20 Steel, & 360 Brass Alloy
  • Assembly hardware: 0-80 & 2-56 machine screws

Jerry Vaught

Jerry Vaught

Ph. 1-931-967-2250
e-mail: rvaught41@peoplepc.com